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This article is about the Novel Series character. You may be looking for her appearance in the Comic Series or her TV Series counterpart. For other pages with the same name, see: Lilly

Right now the safe zone is small, I'll grant you that. But we're planning to expand that wall over there to another block to the north, and this one over here, maybe another two of three blocks to the south, so what we're eventually going to end up with is a town within a town, a safe place for kids, which will, one day, if all goes well, be totally self-contained and totally self-sustainable.
―Lilly introducing Woodbury to the Duprees.[src]

Lilly Caul is the current protagonist and a survivor of the outbreak in Thomas Dunne Books' The Walking Dead . She is a former resident of Tent City who took refuge in Woodbury, Georgia. She, along with her fellow townspeople, aided the Governor in his assault on Rick's group. After the prison assault she became the dedicated leader of Woodbury and later the Sixteenth Street IKEA.

Overview[]

At the beginning of the outbreak, Lilly Caul is introduced as a weak, cowardly young woman who relies on the protection of others such as Joshua Hamilton to survive in the apocalypse. Since a young age, Lilly had been plagued by claustrophobia and anxiety-induced nervous tics which hinder her odds of survival.

Early on she is naturally very distrusting and paranoid of other survivors, a trait which is only heightened after first arriving in the violent town of Woodbury. Early on in Woodbury, Lilly deals with sexism and abuse from the town's many male residents, causing her to further cling to her boyfriend Josh. However, she realizes she doesn't feel the same way towards him as he does her and knows she's only relying on him for protection, causing her to break off their relationship and cause a rift between the two right before Josh's death at the hands of one of Lilly's sexist abusers. Lilly keeps all of the deaths of her friends and family close to her, keeping their memory alive often. Having to gain independence on her own, Lilly quickly becomes a hardened no-nonsense woman, still spurred by her bottled up anxieties and emotional, impulsive behavior, such as her planned coop against the Governor and his henchmen.

With few friends in the town, Lilly becomes very depressed and increasingly emotionally distant, until she discovers the companionship between survivors in the town on a supply run, and becomes attached to a true love interest in Austin Ballard. After finally seeing a real life for herself in the town and with close friends and a love to protect, Lilly finally calls Woodbury home and doesn't notice herself slowly falling into the trap she was so desperate to avoid after arriving, this being the Governor's tight manipulation. Lilly doesn't take any risks when the Prison group brings a possible threat to her new happiness, and becomes a close ally to the Governor. She, however, retains her skepticism and cautiousness of him, seeing him as the town's necessary evil which she is able to live with.

However, after her miscarriage, Lilly becomes blinded by the rage and emotional stress from her lost child, focusing that anger on the town's revenge against the prison group. Ironically during the massacre, Lilly is ordered to shoot and kill Lori Grimes and murders her infant child in the process. This causes Lilly to finally see the Governor for the monster he truly is and kill him, before leading her fellow survivors to safety and taking full control of the town, striving to make it a safe haven for all, free of the dark history the town possessed. The diminished population of the settlement causes Lilly to grow naïve when it comes to her approach to other survivors, especially families and the elderly. Lilly lets the Pentecostal People of God into the town based on the surface-level belief of their Christian innocence and hands over leadership to Jeremiah after the stress of running the town gets to her. She would often fantasize about being a normal resident again without bearing the hard decisions and responsibility of looking after 20+ survivors.

Pre-Apocalypse[]

Marietta, Georgia[]

Lilly was born as an only child in 1974 to Everett Ray Caul, a math teacher, and his wife. She was raised in a middle-class household and lived in an Alton Street house where her nursery was in the airless little knotty-pine room in the rear. Her place brimmed with vinyl records, transistor radios, windup clocks, and first editions crammed into every corner. She grew up playing hide-and-seek with the neighborhood kids and hearing the clarion call of her father—bellow his daughter’s full name as though beckoning a family pet: LILLLLLLLEEEEEEEEEE CAAAAAAUUUUULLL!—echoing over the tops of oak trees, rich with the portents of a hot dinner, bedtime stories, and maybe a TV show or two before lights-out; while she could sense the ticking clock as dinnertime approached, or when her father was out looking for her after curfew by her highly developed sense of the ultradian time.

During first grade, her class took her to Hastings Park down by the river, taking class pictures. She usually ended up alone at the school: playing alone, sitting alone in the back of the cafeteria, or on the school bus.

By 1981, at age 7, her mother slowly passed away from breast cancer, leading her father to raise her well with a tender touch and always be proud of her. She'd smell bacon grease burning in an iron skillet in the morning, a common result of her father's attempts at making breakfast. On vacation, she and her father took on a ferry across the Tennessee River outside Chattanooga, Tennessee. As she felt seasick, her father admonished her to keep her eyes always on the horizon. They also went fishing on the banks of the Chattahoochee River, taking a sun-blanched photo with fishing rods and a huge cooler between them as they sat beaming at the camera.

As a little girl, she loved her father's story that he once told, "Stone Soup," a well-loved folk tale giving the lesson of community sharing. Also, she enjoyed his "spook stories," which many of them told on the porch of their house, usually on autumn nights with the scent of woodsmoke and burning leaves on the breeze. Her father would tell tales of vanishing hitchhikers, disappearing cabinets, and mysterious seagoing vessels doomed to eternally circle the ocean so that she would lap it all up. She also adored the delicious shudders she would get when reading the twist ending of a Shirley Jackson novel, watching the finale of an X-Files episode, or devouring books from the school library such as Strange but True Tales of the Supernatural. But she never truly believed in such a thing as haunting ghosts. However, she feared the thunderbolt when lying in bed during a storm, frantically counting, taking solace in the fact that the lightning bolt was usually miles away—following from the unsure old wives' tale (some part of her took comfort in it) that you count from the moment the thunder fades to the first flicker of lightning and that resulting number is the distance between you and bolt.

One Sunday afternoon in 1983, when she was eight or nine, her father took her to visit his wealthy stepbrother Tom Drinkwater, a commodities trader involved in rolling overseas oil trading, and his sister-in-law Janice in Warner Robins, Georgia. The Drinkwaters lived in an enormous antebellum Tudor mansion, which was a chockablock monstrosity brimming with nooks and crannies and innumerable little side rooms, dumbwaiters, pantries, and water closets in which a disgruntled child could hide for days with a sack lunch and some board games. With the adults sequestered in the breakfast nook, working their way through a pitcher of gin rickeys, she and her cousins, twin brothers Deek and Derek Drinkwater, began to launch into a marathon game of hide-and-seek, having their run of the house. She was good at the game and usually went undetected long past Olly olly oxen free.
However, on this particular day, she found an old storage closet beneath the third-floor staircase and crawled in, closing the rickety old door with a resounding click, the finality of which put gooseflesh on her arms and legs. She curled her knees against her chest and burrowed into the corner behind the mothball-redolent fur coats and musty boxes marked JANICE HATS AND MUFFLERS and TWINS BABY THINGS, and she began to sweat and drenched in seconds. As trying to open the door and found the thing stuck—maybe it had jammed or automatically locked from the outside or something—all she knew at that moment was that she had to get out. Like suffocation, she couldn't breathe in that little closet as she backed into the corner, her scalp prickling, her flesh crawling, the coats hanging down on her face seeming to close in on her, threatening to strangle her. Her heart was racing faster than it ever had before. She felt the walls pressing in, the darkness deepening. A few minutes later, she started to scream. She shrieked and keened and sobbed in the dark of that tiny prison until one of the twins found her, prying the door open and letting her lurch out into the air and light of the hallway.
The incident in the Drinkwater house was soon all but forgotten by everyone present but her, who realized—either through the trauma of the experience or some innate brain chemistry—that she had indeed acquired the claustrophobia & anxiety disorder and would have it for the rest of her life. It certainly was not paraplegia or cancer or anything fatal or debilitating, but it was there within her, as palpable as color blindness or flat-footedness. And it would rear its demonic head within her at the most inopportune times.

During her middle school years, she has wanted to be a mother, getting As in home economics class and scrapbooking photos of babies. At the time, she idolized her social studies teacher, Mrs. Whitman, a woman who walked around the neighborhood with an infant on one hip, a cigarette dangling out of her mouth, and a Virginia Woolf novel in her free hand. Socially, a lot of women were talking about the myth of “having it all”—domestic bliss, career success, a flat tummy, and hot sex—but she knew in her deepest heart of hearts that phrase meant the love of a child; it dwarfed all other considerations. She spent her summers in the girls' barracks back at the Kennesaw Sleepaway Camp in Kennesaw, Georgia. Being deviant, she learned about boys, smoked her first joint, and regularly tippled stolen bottles of crème de menthe, which all happened at a tree house in her backyard where she had for most of her childhood.

As a teenager, she attended Marietta High School, where she was a track star—her specialty was the five-thousand-meter run, which she could complete in just under nineteen minutes. Regardless, she was lonely as her brittle intelligence, stubbornness, and sharp wit set her apart from the pom-pom girl social scene. In her debate class, she always got too emotional trying to rally people to her side, and her emotions always stole her eloquence. She also studied the life of Harry Houdini, a famous escape artist & magician, reading about his technique of escaping the inescapable through a disciplined system of tensing and relaxing.
She developed an ulcer, had panic attacks, and was diagnosed with "chronic anxiety disorder" by the doctor, leading her to spend a lot of couch time at a mental health clinic working on her symptoms. The shrink was a kindly, middle-aged woman named Dr. Cara Leone, who preferred talk therapy to medication and devoted much time to parsing the reasons for her racing thoughts. Partly hormonal, partly growing pangs, partly neurochemical, and partly grief over her mother’s lost battle with cancer, her anxiety attacks always came upon her in a public place, in a crowd, accompanied by a pandemonium of thoughts tumbling around her brain: 'I'm ugly, a loser, overweight, cancer in my genes, people staring at me, I'm going to faint, I couldn’t breathe, I felt the world spinning, I have a brain tumor, I'm going to die right here in this grocery store.' Happily, she managed to either outgrow these spells or work her way through them and transferred to Sprayberry High School.

In 1990, when she was 16, she learned to drive in her father's beat-up Ford Fairlane. She loved his car and had her first romance in it, losing her virginity to Tommy Klein at the Starline Drive-in while the nighttime movie was playing. Around the Christmas season, she would receive and loved to peruse the upscale knickknack Hammacher Schlemmer catalog with the latest gadgets and gewgaws, nose hair trimmers, heated full-body massage chairs, and rechargeable streaming video camera pens.

In a 1991 family gathering, at seventeen, she and her father visited her grandfather Buck's place in Valdosta, Georgia. During the dinner, she witnessed her uncle Mike suffering a heart attack by her very eyes at the kitchen table. Even so, he surprised no one when he bowed his head at the dining table like he was either praying or about to take a header into his collard greens. The strangest part was how he looked up casually and said, ‘Oops … here comes,’ like he was expecting a package or a court summons. And everybody around the table knew what he was talking about and what it entailed. Nobody panicked or even rushed to the telephone. They only immediately argued about what vehicle to deploy to take him to the hospital.
Meanwhile, she waited for the man to clutch his chest dramatically and flop onto his back in seizures of agony like in the movies, but that never happened. She saw her dad’s older brother writhing in pain on the couch out in the living room, complaining that it felt like an iron vise was tightening around his chest. His skin color was going so pallid and gray it looked as though the man was made of marble. That night, her family finally took him away to Atlanta Medical Center, where she came once visiting him later—memorizing the claustrophobic labyrinth of corridors and the disinfectant smells.

During her senior year, she has known Megan Lafferty and befriended her. They soon became inseparable, sharing everything from homework to drugs to boyfriends. The two girls would get high in the bathroom and climb up on the school's roof and throw pebbles at the jocks running drills behind the basketball courts. Megan saved her life by dropping her off at the emergency room when she succumbed to a ruptured appendix during her senior class trip. She had been her best gal-pal for years as being in wildest party modes together and traveled to Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, taking a snapshot on a disposable camera of them at a local bar with both completely baked; their eyes glazed over and red as cinders.

Atlanta, Georgia[]

After graduating high school, she got designs on a career and moved to Atlanta. She spent two years of purgatory at Massey College of Business, losing time on drunken binges, then headed to Georgia Institute of Technology for an MBA she would never get. She had to deliver a presentation to the admission committee at Georgia Tech, preparing her notes on index cards and having rehearsed for weeks. But when she got up in front of those tenured professors in a stuffy meeting room on North Avenue, she shook so much she dropped the stack of cards all over the floor and completely choked. Despite that difficulties, she was able to enter the school safely. She wanted to be a fashionista, maybe run a clothing design business, as her funky sense of fashion—first developed in the thrift shops and Salvation Army stores of Marietta with her guilty pleasures of haunting them for the perfect scarf, sweater, or blouse—could make ten dollars & an afternoon at a secondhand store stretch into an entire wardrobe.

In 1994, at Georgia Tech, she had done a brief stint as a freshman gymnast. Each night, she used to travel the Marietta Street artery as a major thoroughfare to get to her class at university. She took courses such as anthropology about Algonquin Indians and single solitary theater playing Macbeth. She wrote a paper for Psych 203 called "The Mother of Invention," writing in her typically hyperbolic nineteen-year-old style: "It is an undeniable fact of all human existence that all great inventions of the human imagination are pumped up and enhanced by life-and-death situations." It was a scholarly study of how the snap judgments of people in stressful situations—cops, soldiers, paramedics—often led to ingenious solutions, which occasionally become standard operating procedure in places like emergency rooms and modern battlefields.

During the mid-1990s, her BFF Megan used to rent her cozy little condo in Delaney Street, the Georgia Tech student ghetto, sharing with her. Their home, with its big dormer window in front, a lithograph wall hanging of Joni Mitchell from the early 1970s, and an inherited old grandfather clock, would never be depicted in Architectural Digest or win any Good Housekeeping awards for interior design. Still, it was always tidy, situated on a tree-lined boulevard, and cleaned up well. At Christmastime, she would string tiny white lights along the picket fence that lined the driveway, and her friend would climb up on the roof, hang multicolored bulbs, and set out cardboard reindeer. In the cold winter months, the odor of the landfill abutting their postage-stamp-sized backyard would be kept at bay, and the scent of pine and cinnamon would greet her when she got home from school or work in retail every night, stomping the mud off her boots in the vestibule. She lived in it for nearly three years while figuring out who she wanted to be when she grew up.

In 2002, she earned tenure as an associate professor at Georgia Tech, which resulted from efforts after slogging through her twenties without ever enjoying a serious relationship that might have led to her children. She had to be on antianxiety meds, but her right soon got aborted. Instead, she got a chance to pursue her original dream as far as the reception area of her first interview—a highly coveted internship with a fashion company—before chickening out. Her old companion, fear, put the kibosh on all her plans, making her flee that lavish lobby, give up, and return home.

By mid-2003, she resumed her slacker lifestyle and worked as a lifeguard. She had taken tabs of X until she forgot how many she did, sat on couches, and watched TV soap opera reruns: General Hospital, The Young and the Institutionalized, The Young and the Restless. She still harbored dreams—stillborn aspirations, perhaps, but nonetheless. She secretly longed to go to New York, start a Web site, or go back to that company's receptionist and say, “Oops, sorry, just had to step out for a year and a half…”

Post-Apocalypse[]

Cobb County, Georgia[]

At the beginning of the outbreak, the first wave of walkers hit the north side where Everett and Lilly lived hard. They came from blue-collar areas such as the industrial parks north of Kennesaw woods and creeped into the population initially unnoticed. Everett decided to pack Lilly up and flee in their beat-up VW wagon. The pair got as far as U.S. 4, before the wreckage on the roads slowed them down. They found a rogue city bus a mile south travelling up and down the back streets, picking up survivors in need and tried to make it on board as they were surrounded by walkers. Knowing that they wouldn't both make it, Everett made an attempt to ensure Lilly's survival. He slammed the bus' folding accordion door behind her at the last possible instant, as three zombies latched onto him and slid to the pavement. His blood washed up across the glass as the bus sped out of there. As a result of his death, Lilly went into a kind of catatonic state and curled into a fetal position on a bench seat, staring at the blood-smeared door all the way to Atlanta.

Atlanta, Georgia[]

After her father's death, Lilly calls Megan as at that point cell phones were still functioning, and the pair manage to arrange a rendezvous on the outskirts of Heartsfield Airport. By a minor miracle, the friends reunite and set out together on foot, hitchhiking south, flopping in deserted houses and concentrating on survival. On their journey the tension between them intensifies. Each seems to be compensating for the terror and loss in different ways. Lilly by going inward, and Megan by staying high most of the time, constantly talking and latching on to any other traveller they run into.

Tent City[]

Thirty miles southwest of Atlanta, the two women meet a caravan of three families from Lawrenceville travelling in two minivans. Megan convinces Lilly there is safety in numbers, and Lilly agrees to join the group for a while. Soon after joining the group, Megan develops an attraction towards one of the head of the families, Chad Bingham. Lilly is appalled to see the pair flirting amid this waking nightmare, and it wasn’t long before Megan and Chad were hiding in rest stop buildings to have sex, despite Chad's wife Donna being a part of the group. Because of this, the wedge between Megan and Lilly grows deeper. Around this time at sunset one evening, the caravan gets pinned down by a pack of walkers in a Kmart parking lot, when they're saved by Joshua Hamilton who easily kills the half-dozen zombies. Lilly and the caravan thank him profusely and allow him to join.

The Road to Woodbury[]

"Red Day Rising"[]

Lilly is first seen in Tent City, a large football field sized clearing filled with tents and nearly one hundred survivors. She tries to hammer in a tent stake while her friend, Josh observes. She gets infuriated so he tries to show her how its done. Eventually she hammers the stake into the ground through sheer rage. A swarm of walkers attacks the camp and Josh is surrounded by three. Lilly panics and runs away, leaving Josh for dead. Josh kills a few before being saved by some others survivors before he can get bitten. Lilly feels incredibly guilty about this. The next day Megan tries to get Lilly to speak to Josh but she can't bring herself to. They get into a short argument because of Megan constantly doing drugs and sleeping with everyone. After that Lilly babysits the four Bingham girls. Bob Stookey returns from a supply run and they begin talking. Bob convinces Lilly to speak to Josh who believes she is mad at him for some reason. Lilly nervously approaches Josh and tries to joke around, attempting to show him how to chop firewood. She starts trembling which gets Josh's attention so they sit down and talk. Josh forgives her for running away and tells her she did the right thing, Lilly isn't convinced by this. In the morning most of the survivors leave on a search for firewood, Josh included. Lilly watches the Bingham girls again and a large swarm of walkers attacks the camp. Lilly saves the girls from the collapsed circus tent and locks them in a vehicle, however Sarah Bingham runs away and is swiftly devoured by walkers. Lilly lures away the swarm back into the forest and passes out by a tree. She is later found by a scouting party lead by Chad Bingham, the group's leader, who wants to kill Lilly for letting Sarah die. Megan stops him. Afterwards a funeral is held for the sixteen survivors who were killed. Josh makes a speech but breaks down half way through and goes off to find the only two people who aren't present: Lilly and Chad. Lilly apologises to Chad in the forest away from the camp. Chad flips out in Lilly for letting Sarah die, despite his other three children being saved. He breaks a few of Lilly's rips and busts her lip before he is stopped by Josh who repeatedly and unmercifully rams the back of his skull into a tree, killing him. Later the camp's elders vote to kick Josh out the camp, so Lilly decides to join him. Before they leave Bob decides to leave with them, soon after joined by Megan and Scott Moon (her new stoner boyfriend). They leave in Bob's truck with a load of supplies.

Soon after leaving Tent City, they stop off at an abandoned gas station which they decide to stay in. They make frequent scavenger runs into Tent City which is falling apart. One night Lilly and Josh get close while hunting. Josh talks about his mom and they begin to form a relationship, however decide to take it slow. That night, two vehicles crash into the gas station which partially destroys it and forces the group to leave and search for someplace new. They stop off at Tent City which has burned down and become overrun. The group becomes more tense as winter closes in. Lilly and Josh start to worry about Bob who is becoming more and more dependent on alcohol. Bob returns from fishing and takes the group to an abandoned Walmart he found. Lilly thinks about clearing it out to live in, however Josh thinks the place is too much of a target. After scavenging for a while, Megan is taken hostage by another group outside the store. A man enters and calls out for anyone inside. Bob jumps up and holds the man and gunpoint which forces Josh, Lilly and Scott to reveal themselves also. The man calms everyone down and introduces himself as Martinez. The group gives back Megan and Martinez invites everyone to come back to their community. Josh doesn't think this is a bad idea and they can just check the place out. Lilly agrees with Josh. They decide to join Martinez and go to the community: Woodbury, Georgia.

"This Is How the World Ends"[]

Lilly and the group are taken into Woodbury's courthouse to meet the town's leader, Philip Blake (formerly known as Brian Blake). Lilly doesn't like him and how he acts around Megan. During this talk, Scott jokes about him being the President, Philip prefers 'The Governor'.

During their time in Woodbury the group becomes more distant. Lilly and Josh stick with each other while Megan prostitutes herself for drugs, Scott goes missing and Bob is befriended by the Governor. The town's residents are very hostile to one another which gets Josh and Lilly on edge, especially when Josh tries to trade supplies for food and Sam 'The Butcher' suggests Lilly goes into prostitution. Some time later, Josh and Lilly form a stronger relationship and end up having passionate sex in the back of Bob's camper. Lilly wants her and Josh to leave the town for good so they start going off and exploring the surrounding area. One day they come across a neighbourhood and stay in a house they like. However all the back yards lead to a steep ditch filled which walkers who are starting to climb up it. Josh and Lilly return to the house one day and Lilly decides to break up with Josh because she feels like she is using him for protection and doesn't really love him. This gets Josh mad and they have a heated argument before the walkers break into the house and the two flee upstairs. Josh saves Lilly and burns down the house with the walkers in it. They walk back to Woodbury in silence and upon entering are greeted by Sam who wants their duffel bag of supplies. Him and Josh fight for it and when Josh begins to walk away Sam shoots him in the back of the head which traumatizes Lilly. Josh dies in her arms and Sam tries pulling her away which results in her fighting back and attacking him. Martinez arrives on the scene and tackles Sam through the food store's window. Lilly is lost without Josh and is taken into Bob's care. Sam is killed in the Governor's new roman gladiator style arena. Lilly gets to know Dr. Dr. Stevens and Alice Warren and the three have a small party on Christmas eve. Martinez later joins and they start talking about how the Governor is going to run the town off a cliff. This gets Lilly thinking.

On January 1st, Megan commits suicide after sleeping with the Governor and discovering Scott's severed head in a fish tank. This deeply troubles Bob who now needs Lilly to look after him and Lilly starts setting up burial arrangements.

Lilly organises a plot against the Governor and gets Martinez in on it. The plot involves a kidnapping during the arena fights, where the Governor would be loaded into a truck and brought out into the woods where they would execute him. The plan works perfectly however they had to capture Gabe and Bruce as well which almost gets the Governor to catch on before he is knocked out. Their van comes to a stop when a large herd of walkers starts attacking them the Governor manages to escape from being tied up. Bruce holds Lilly at knife point but the Governor spares her life, insisting they need to work together to escape. Eventually they make it back to Woodbury however all four of Martinez's most loyal men were killed during the incident. The Governor brings Stevens and Alice into a room below the racetrack and begins lecturing them all about not questioning his leadership. The next day Lilly and the group are forced to chop up all the bodies of the National Guardsmen under the racetrack. Lilly curses the Governor under her breath.

The Fall of the Governor[]

"The Gathering"[]

Lilly and Alice watch Gabe and Bruce fight in the arena. Lilly is disgusted and gets up to leave. Alice warns her that the Governor is still watching them after their failed assassination attempt and tells Lilly to act casual. Lilly has a nightmare that night about Josh and wakes up to banging on her door. She opens it and finds Martinez who reminds her of their supply run today. Lilly joins Martinez, Gus Strunk, David and Barbara Stern and Austin Ballard outside next to a cargo truck. They load up and go out in search of a Piggly Wiggly. Austin starts playfully flirting with Lilly which gets on her nerves. She asks the Sterns to tell their honeymoon story again, hoping it will make her feel better about herself however it makes her feel helpless instead. They arrive at the store and find it deserted. Martinez spots a windowless warehouse behind it which they investigate. Inside, the building is filled with walkers; once they clear the place out they split up into small groups and quickly raid any supplies from the mostly filled, however out of date shelves. Austin is attacked by a walker and is saved by Lilly before he can get bit. Austin makes a quick joke which Lilly gets in on before they quickly hurry back to the others. While they're filling the truck with their supplies a walker approaches the group, Lilly unloads her six remaining bullets into its cranium.

On the way back to Woodbury they all start talking and laughing with each other. Lilly finally sees what Woodbury could be if everyone looked out for everybody else. Just then, everyone hears an alien sound they haven't heard in months. Its a helicopter. The aircraft crashes into the surrounding forest so Martínez and Gus follow it. They can't get any closer so the Sterns guard their truck while the others investigate. Austin is once again attacked while crossing a swamp but Lilly helps look after him. They reach the wrecked helicopter and rescue an injured woman from inside. The pilot is dead however the lady wants to retrieve his body for a Christian burial. Lilly convinces Martinez to go along with this despite them both knowing what the Governor will do with it.

When they return to Woodbury with the goldmine of supplies, Lilly returns home. Austin tags along with her and thanks her for looking out for him. He invites her to watch the arena fight tonight but she declines. Before the fight starts Austin thinks about Lilly. He decides to miss the fight and go back to her place to spend time with her. He asks Lilly if she can teach him how to properly defend himself because of how inexperienced he is. They go over many different things Austin needs to learn and he gets frustrated when Lilly constantly repeats herself and asks him the same questions. He trips over a branch due to being careless and Lilly apologises for laughing. They share a moment and almost kiss until Lilly realises that Austin fell on his knife and has a large cut down his leg. She hurries him off to the infirmary.

They stop to speak to the Governor who watches the arena walkers devour some bodies. He is now missing his ear which makes Lilly and Austin uncomfortable. He tells them that a group of strangers attacked him above the arena. One took off his ear and he sliced off the leader's hand in defence. Lilly thanks him for keeping the town together and takes Austin to the infirmary. Lilly sits Austin down on a bed and Alice takes a look at him. Stevens is occupied looking after one of the strangers, the man who is missing his hand, apparently named 'Rick Grimes'. Stevens believes the Governor attacked Rick and that he and his friends have done nothing wrong. Lilly asks how he can be so sure and wonders if the Governor is telling the truth. Stevens wants to know what's gotten into her and why she is suddenly in support of the Governor. Lilly just wants to consider all the options and fears for an attack.

TBA

Main article: Lilly Caul (Comic Series)

"The Fall"[]

In the aftermath of the assault, Lilly and the Woodbury residents who fled the zombies are trapped inside the prison. Lilly rallies the survivors and promises them that she will lead them to safety. Eventually Austin sacrifices himself to lure the mass of roamers away from the door, giving Lilly and other Woodbury residents a chance to escape. Lilly manages to destroy the herd of roamers and lead the survivors back to Woodbury. Out of the two dozen Woodbury citizens who participated in the prison assault, only six survived.

Overall the number of residents in Woodbury stand at twenty nine: nine women, fourteen men and six children under the age of twelve. After returning to Woodbury, Lilly puts down Penny Blake with the help of Bob Stookey and the Governor's victims with a shotgun, purging the last of the Governor's madness from the earth. The novel ends with Lilly, now the new leader of Woodbury, welcoming the new refugees that arrive at the town: the Dupree family.

Descent[]

TBA

Invasion[]

TBA

Search and Destroy[]

TBA

Return to Woodbury[]

A few months after settling into the Sixteenth Street Ikea, Lilly insists upon returning to Woodbury despite recently having discovered the town to be mostly destroyed and there being no sign of David Stern whom Lilly had left behind in charge of it, citing the fact that the store is getting to be too dangerous. Only Tommy and a small group agrees to make the trip with her, the rest instead preferring to stay in the comfort of the store despite the increasing dangers.

However, Lilly and the Woodburians come under assault by a hostile group led by Spencer-Lee Dryden who kill several of her people and imprison the rest in a pit near Woodbury. Spencer-Lee is eventually killed by Tommy, but he is unable to rescue the group, falling into the pit himself and revealing that he has already been bitten. Reanimating, Spencer-Lee falls into the pit too and bites Lilly in the ankle before Bethany puts him down with a machete. Knowing that he won't survive his bite, Tommy amputates Lilly's foot and has Ashley Duart shoot him once he dies, calling Lilly "Mom" for the first time before cutting her foot off. After fending off a herd of walkers drawn by all of the noise, the townspeople are able to escape from the pit.

Having survived her bite and amputation, Lilly adjusts to a prosthetic built for her by David and settles back into her role as the leader of Woodbury, filled with hope that they will be successful in building a lasting community this time.

Killed Victims[]

This list shows the victims Lilly has killed:

Appearances[]

Novel Series

The Road to Woodbury

  • "Red Day Rising"
    • "Chapter One"
    • "Chapter Two"
    • "Chapter Three"
    • "Chapter Four"
    • "Chapter Five"
    • "Chapter Six"
    • "Chapter Seven"
  • "This Is How the World Ends"
    • "Chapter Eight"
    • "Chapter Nine"
    • "Chapter Ten"
    • "Chapter Eleven"
    • "Chapter Twelve"
    • "Chapter Thirteen"
    • "Chapter Fourteen"
    • "Chapter Fifteen"
    • "Chapter Sixteen"
    • "Chapter Seventeen"
    • "Chapter Eighteen"
    • "Chapter Nineteen"

The Fall of the Governor - Part One

  • "The Gathering"
    • "Chapter One"
    • "Chapter Two"
    • "Chapter Three"
    • "Chapter Four"
    • "Chapter Five"
    • "Chapter Six"
    • "Chapter Eight"
    • "Chapter Nine"
    • "Chapter Ten"
    • "Chapter Eleven"
    • "Chapter Twelve"
  • "Showtime"
    • "Chapter Thirteen"
    • "Chapter Sixteen"
    • "Chapter Seventeen"
    • "Chapter Eighteen"

The Fall of the Governor - Part Two

  • "Battlefield"
    • "Chapter Two"
    • "Chapter Three"
    • "Chapter Four"
    • "Chapter Five"
    • "Chapter Six"
    • "Chapter Seven"
    • "Chapter Eight"
    • "Chapter Nine"
  • "Doomsday Clock"
    • "Chapter Ten"
    • "Chapter Eleven"
    • "Chapter Twelve"
    • "Chapter Thirteen"
    • "Chapter Fourteen"
    • "Chapter Fifteen"
    • "Chapter Sixteen"
  • "The Fall"
    • "Chapter Seventeen"
    • "Chapter Eighteen"
    • "Chapter Nineteen"
    • "Chapter Twenty"
    • "Chapter Twenty-One"
    • "Chapter Twenty-Two"
    • "Chapter Twenty-Three"

Descent

  • "Lake of Fire"
    • "Chapter One"
    • "Chapter Two"
    • "Chapter Three"
    • "Chapter Four"
    • "Chapter Five"
    • "Chapter Six"
  • "The Labyrinth"
    • "Chapter Seven"
    • "Chapter Eight"
    • "Chapter Nine"
    • "Chapter Ten"
    • "Chapter Eleven"
    • "Chapter Twelve"
    • "Chapter Thirteen"
    • "Chapter Fourteen"
    • "Chapter Fifteen"
    • "Chapter Sixteen"
    • "Chapter Seventeen"
    • "Chapter Eighteen"
  • "Last Rites"
    • "Chapter Twenty"
    • "Chapter Twenty-One"
    • "Chapter Twenty-Two"
    • "Chapter Twenty-Three"
    • "Chapter Twenty-Four"
    • "Chapter Twenty-Five"
    • "Chapter Twenty-Six"
    • "Chapter Twenty-Seven"
    • "Chapter Twenty-Eight"
    • "Chapter Twenty-Nine"

Invasion

  • "The Behavior of the Sheep"
    • "Chapter Five"
    • "Chapter Six"
  • "The End of the Whole Mess"
    • "Chapter Eight"
    • "Chapter Nine"
    • "Chapter Ten"
    • "Chapter Eleven"
    • "Chapter Twelve"
    • "Chapter Thirteen"
    • "Chapter Fourteen"
  • "The Great Steel Oblivion"
    • "Chapter Sixteen"
    • "Chapter Seventeen"
    • "Chapter Eighteen"
    • "Chapter Nineteen"
    • "Chapter Twenty"
    • "Chapter Twenty-Two"
    • "Chapter Twenty-Three"
    • "Chapter Twenty-Four"
    • "Chapter Twenty-Five"
    • "Chapter Twenty-Six"

Search and Destroy

  • Stone Soup"
    • "Chapter One"
    • "Chapter Two"
    • "Chapter Three"
    • "Chapter Four"
  • "Scorched Earth"
    • "Chapter Five"
    • "Chapter Six"
    • "Chapter Seven"
    • "Chapter Eight"
    • "Chapter Nine"
  • "Nightshade"
    • "Chapter Ten"
    • "Chapter Eleven"
    • "Chapter Twelve"
    • "Chapter Thirteen"
    • "Chapter Fourteen"
    • "Chapter Fifteen"
  • "Perchance To Dream"
    • "Chapter Sixteen"
    • "Chapter Seventeen"
    • "Chapter Eighteen"
    • "Chapter Nineteen"
    • "Chapter Twenty"
    • "Chapter Twenty-One"
    • "Chapter Twenty-Two"
    • "Chapter Twenty-Three"
    • "Chapter Twenty-Four"
    • "Chapter Twenty-Five"

Return to Woodbury

  • "Exodus"
    • "Chapter One"
    • "Chapter Three"
    • "Chapter Four"
    • "Chapter Five"
    • "Chapter Six"
  • "Welcome to the Terrordome"
    • "Chapter Seven"
    • "Chapter Eight"
    • "Chapter Nine"
    • "Chapter Ten"
    • "Chapter Eleven"
  • "The Sky Is Bleeding"
    • "Chapter Fourteen"
    • "Chapter Fifteen"
    • "Chapter Sixteen"
    • "Chapter Seventeen"
    • "Chapter Eighteen"
    • "Chapter Nineteen"
    • "Chapter Twenty"
    • "Chapter Twenty-One"
    • "Chapter Twenty-Two"
    • "Chapter Twenty-Three"
  • "Los Primeros Dias"

Novels 1 2 3 4 5
Rise of the Governor
The Road to Woodbury
The Fall of the Governor
Descent
Invasion
Search and Destroy
Return to Woodbury
Appears Voice is heard
👁 Appears with no lines Appears in a flashback
Appears as a walker 🖼 Appears in a photograph/video
Appears as a corpse Appears in a hallucination/dream

Trivia[]

  • Lilly's blood type is O negative.[2]
  • Lilly has a tattoo of a Chinese character on her lower back.
  • Lilly suffers from a severe case of claustrophobia and anxiety disorder.
    • Lilly has a lot of tics which appear when she is nervous or afraid. Most notable of these is her biting her nails.
  • Lilly is one of the three characters to survive a zombie bite due to amputation, others being Dale and Connie.
    • Lilly is one of the many amputee victims, and one of them still alive.
    • Lilly and Heath are currently the only amputees that have prosthetic limbs. Lilly has her foot cut off after being bitten, and given a prosthetic foot by David Stern.
  • Originally, Lilly was supposed to be the character with the same name from the game. Upon the release of the The Road to Woodbury, as well as Robert Kirkman confirming in a Letter Hacks, that Lilly Caul is separate from the Lilly in the Telltale Series, the two Lillys are canonically separate characters.
    • Also, the in-game achievement that displays when Lilly leaves the group was changed from "Woodbury bound" to "What now?".
  • As of The Walking Dead: Invasion, Lilly is the sole surviving Woodburian who appears in both the Comic Series and the Novel Series. She is also the only surviving Tent City refugee as well.
  • Lilly and Grace Murkherjee are the only known survivors in The Walking Dead franchise to have a miscarriage.
  • Lilly is one of the five characters in The Walking Dead franchise who survive a zombie bite due to amputation and confirmed to be alive, others being Clementine, Elton, Lydia and Alicia.

References[]

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